English Family Parenting Special Needs

The lucky ones. In memory of Donna Quirke.

When people find out that my four year old is deaf, their first reaction is to say that they are sorry.

Every single time I answer with a line that leaves them perplexed:

“Don’t be sorry for me. I’m one of the lucky ones”.

And every single time, they have a hard time understanding why I consider myself lucky. I am happy to elaborate, when they stay long enough to find out.

I am one of the lucky ones because my son is here. Too many moms, including myself, have miscarriages and stillbirths.

I am one of the lucky ones because my son is healthy. Too many parents have to nurse their kids through illnesses that most adults wouldn’t be able to cope with.

I am one of the lucky ones because my son will be here. Too many parents have to say goodbye to their kids, because of cancer, because of congenital diseases, because of violence, because life sometimes is crap.

I am one of the lucky ones because my son will go to school, he will go to college, have a girlfriend, or boyfriend, or whatever kids are dating by the time he is 35. He will drive a car, he will have a job. He will have an independent life. Too many parents have to wonder what their kids, who completely depend on them, will do when they grow up.

I am one of the lucky ones because I get to argue with my kids, and I get to say that I am exhausted, and I get to complain about the drives, the sleepless nights, the fights, the comebacks. Too many parents wish they could complain about all that.

I am one of the lucky ones because my kids have shelter, food on the table, access to medical support, access to education, a safe environment. Too many parents wish they could give even one of those things to their kids.

Moms often say that they don’t want their kids to grow up. We are so wrong. Yes, we want for our kids to grow up. Of course we do.

This is beautiful Donna. Since they lost her, her family has raised $373,472 for St. Baldricks throguh donations like yours.
This is beautiful Donna. Since they lost her, her family has raised $373,472 for St. Baldricks throguh donations like yours.

Pediatric cancer research is underfunded. 1200 kids die of cancer each year in the US. That is almost 4 per day, a number that could be drastically reduced with better funded research. And although changing the world may seem like too big of a goal to even try, you can make a difference. And if we all make a difference, things will start to change.

Because of that, and so kids with cancer have a chance to keep growing, and living, and fighting, I ask you to donate. You can join Donna’s Good Things here, and donate through her page. I just did.

Do it for all these kids, for the ones who are not here anymore, and the ones who are still fighting. For kids like Donna.

And because luck can change any day.
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